WELCOMING THE JAPANESE VISITOR

Tips for how to make Japanese travellers feel at home around the world

Japanese people have long been among the greatest travellers from Asia. They know the world and love visiting new places. But much as this is the case, their customs and habits are very different to those of “westerners”, and while many accept our western lifestyle while travelling, following are a few tips to make them feel a little bit more at home in your hotel.

LANGUAGE

If possible, ensure all in-room documents are also available in Japanese. If possible, invoices should be produced in Japanese in order to avoid confusion and bad feelings if the visitor believes he or she has been wrongly charged for something.

HOT WATER

Japanese tourists love their instant cup noodles, miso soup and green tea, so it is essential to provide them with adequate facilities for this (electric kettle etc.).

CLOTHES DRYING

Don’t be surprised if Japanese travellers dry their swimming trunks and towels on the terrace. Japanese people generally prefer to dry clothes outside, for sanitary reasons.

SECURITY

(pas de légende) prise par Richard

In Japan, travellers are not used to locking doors and hiding valuables in a safe. The result can be a “bad surprise” if they leave cash and valuables lying around in a western property. If a theft takes place, management should take immediate action, and a Japanese speaking interpreter may be required to help the victim explain to the police what happened. Likewise, for lost items, it is important that when found, if the guest has departed, the tour operator be contacted in order to ascertain how to remit the items.

EMERGENCIES

Ensure you have a Japanese speaking doctor on call in case of health or medical issues. Failing this a competent interpreter will be required.

Japanese speaking robot (prise par Richard).jpg

ROBOTS

Japanese love high-tech. A Japanese speaking robot is a definite plus!

THE CLIENT IS KING

This tends to be even more the case with Japanese customers, who may appear to be overly demanding with staff at times. This is due to the country’s status-oriented society, where hotel staff are always extremely subservient and polite. Hotel management and staff members should thus pay particular attention to the way they address Japanese guests. If something goes wrong, and the customer is upset for any reason, management should be extremely apologetic, and the offering of a gift of some kind can always help.