NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: THINKING BIGGER

Lynn Cutter, executive vice president of travel at National Geographic Partners, talks about how things have been evolving since the creation of a joint venture between National Geographic Society and 21st Century Fox.

We asked her to tell us a little more… 

There have been many benefits of being a part of National Geographic Partners, the new joint venture between National Geographic Society and 21st Century Fox. We believe the merger has made us a standout among media companies in a number of ways, including the fact that we return 27% of our proceeds to the non-profit National Geographic Society, creating a virtuous cycle of storytelling and philanthropy committed to furthering science, conservation and exploration. We also have now have more resources available to us, which enables us to think bigger and further build on the success of National Geographic Expeditions. (Stay tuned!)

We’ve just introduced a new private jet trip that links some unconventional destinations: Iran, Belarus, Turkmenistan and Serbia to name a few

What has changed in terms of the way you operate?

The change in corporate structure has not impacted our trips or the underlying philosophy of National Geographic’s Travel programs in any way. We are still providing the same unique, high-quality experiences that we’ve always provided. We are still offering some of the most creative itineraries and travel experiences available. For example, one of our newest expeditions brings travellers to Madagascar in the company of a National Geographic grantee who is one of the world’s top lemur experts. We explore human origins in France and Spain, visiting important prehistoric rock art sites with renowned paleontologists. In Cuba, we offer a photography-focused people-to-people experience led by a National Geographic photographer. And we’ve just introduced a new private jet trip that links some unconventional destinations: Iran, Belarus, Turkmenistan and Serbia to name a few. In collaboration with Lindblad Expeditions, we are expanding our fleet with two new ships: the National Geographic Quest is launching this May, and another is to come in 2018.  We’re still setting the bar for sustainability, experiences, and service in the hospitality industry with the National Geographic Unique Lodges collection, which is now up to 55 extraordinary properties around the world.

Furthering the knowledge and understanding of our world is, and always has been, the core purpose of National Geographic since its inception 128 years ago. We continue to grow and look for new opportunities to support this purpose by offering compelling travel experiences, coupled with National Geographic’s engaging content and our prestigious roster of experts.