WELCOMING CHINESE VISITORS GLOBALLY

Tips and ideas on what to provide, and what to avoid!

DOs

Chinese_Tourist_Group_Royal_Palace_Madrid.jpg

Chinese tourist group at the Royal Palace in Madrid 

Mandarin Speaking Staff: Obviously a key to pleasing Chinese visitors is to have at least one staff member who is fluent in Mandarin.

Provide Chinese language TV, newspapers, city maps, and in-room instructions (such as safe, hotel guide etc.) as well as signage (way-finding) in Mandarin. Free Wi-Fi: Chinese are used to having free Wi-Fi in hotels throughout Asia, and expect the same worldwide.

Kettles in Guestrooms: Most Asians are used to making their own tea in their rooms, and a nice touch is to include a selection of Chinese teas.

Slippers should be provided for all Asian guests, as they are used to taking off their shoes as they enter a room.

Toothpaste, Toothbrush and Razors: Many Chinese travellers don’t carry these items as they expect them to be provided in the room.

Restaurant menus and all other hotel information should be in Mandarin, and on the subject of food, fruit should always be served in portions, never whole.

Waiters should always serve the eldest or the most highly educated person first.

Breakfast: Consider offering traditional Asian breakfast including Dim Sum, noodles and rice porridge.

Guests should be greeted politely without any physical contact.

RESTAURANT MENUS AND ALL OTHER HOTEL INFORMATION SHOULD BE IN MANDARIN, AND ON THE SUBJECT OF FOOD, FRUIT SHOULD ALWAYS BE SERVED IN PORTIONS, NEVER WHOLE.

Business and credit cards: the hotel’s business card should always be offered with both hands. When a Chinese (or other Asian) visitor gives over his credit card or business card, it should also be taken with both hands, and treated with great respect. Concerning credit cards, AliPay and UnionPay cards are used by a great number of Chinese tourists, so offering these services is a big plus.

DON’Ts

Avoid the number 4: Chinese visitors should never be given a room on the fourth floor of a hotel, or a room with the number four in it, because in Mandarin the number is associated with “death”.

Avoid giving a high-ranking Chinese visitor a lower floor than one of their subordinates. This is an insult (even if the rooms are the same).

Never point with one finger (which is considered very rude), but use the whole hand.