IN THE FIELD WITH DAVID ESSERYK- Part 14 / Tips in Developing Marketing Messages Towards Hoteliers

A MESSAGE TO TECH PROVIDERS

Most hotel tech companies spend countless hours crafting taglines, boilerplates, and elevator pitches, aiming to nail a complex product in just a few words. While at the same time, communication fatigue is leaving fewer opportunities for marketing messages to resonate with their target audience. Developing marketing messages is one of the most important steps you take toward market dominance, so with all that in mind, here are some tips to get you started.

BE SUCCINCT AND KISS
(KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID)

Does your brand message connect with your core capabilities? Is your sales team able to easily find and reuse the messaging components they need to quickly communicate with buyers around their business issues? Get your message down to the fewest possible
words that can convey whom your product serves and what it does.

DON’T OVERTHINK AND MISS THE MARK

Ensure that positioning and messaging addresses customer pain points and what customers want. Too often, messages get hung up on attempts to appear uber-innovative as opposed to letting the product speak for itself. Remember, you can make your audience respond without getting overly abstract and forgetting the point.

GIVE YOUR AUDIENCE SOMETHING THAT SPEAKS TO THEM. KNOW WHO IS BUYING YOUR PRODUCT AND WHAT PROBLEM YOU ARE SOLVING FOR THEM

TARGET THE MESSAGE

When the message is too broad, it does not reach anyone. If you find your company trying to appeal to travel intermediaries and hotels simultaneously, it may be time to look more closely at your product. Divide and conquer. Sometimes this means creating two different products, and sometimes this simply means creating two distinct messages for different buyer personas.

USE THE VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER

Technology should be driven by the people who will benefit from it. Too much tech jargon, especially in an industry with plenty of non-technical people, can be a turn-off. Give your audience something that speaks to them. Know who is buying your product and what problem you are solving for them: a GM, a marketing director, an HR person, a catering manager, and so forth. Then decide at what level your message should be written.
Your brand messaging feeds all of your communication with your market. Use it in your sales literature and tools, your website and all of your campaigns. Test key messages with customers and tweak as needed based on results.

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